Posts Tagged ‘Norge’

Tjuvholmen Developments, Oslo

January 18, 2012

On a cold winter’s evening after a day of photographing landscape architecture projects I was exploring the new developments on the south side of Aker Brygge at Tjuvholmen. A new hotel and gallery complex is dramatically forming. With only the surrounding ambient light and a few stray floodlights from the docks behind, some interesting results were achieved.

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Oseana Gallery and Cultural Centre

January 4, 2012

Councils across europe have finally begun to show more confidence in the growth potential of investing in architecturally brave cultural centers. This probably stems from the success of the Guggenheim in Bilbao and New York. Here is a humbler example from the West coast of Norway in Os. Designed by Grieg Arkitekter AS a fun and exciting building has been produced. The project houses a new gallery, concert hall and restaurant. Looking out on to the wild fjord it is the perfect location to enjoy cultural activities.

The interior design and branding was completed by the local design firm Fuggibaggi Design AS

Eger Shopping Centre, Karl Johan Gate, Oslo

November 1, 2011

This is Norways most prestigious high end retail shopping centre. Based in the centre of Oslo between the central station and the palace on Karl Johan’s Street it sits in a prime location. The renovation and joining of multiple adjacent buildings was Link Arkitekter’s largest challenge. The complex interior space is set across three floors, cleaverly connected by a collection of ramps, walkways and stairs.

Contemporary Church Design

December 20, 2010

Frøyland og Orstad Kirke, Norway

Having just returned from 3 months in Southern Africa photographing over 200+ religious structures it only seemed natural to head to the icy temperatures of Norway. Link Arkitektur AS have delivered a fascinating amalgamation of traditional Scandinavian design with an almost contemporary Italian energy inside.

The church nestles in the countryside of Kleppe Kommune, surrounded by the rolling hills that are prevalent in this district just outside of Stavanger. The church also functions as a local theatre with state of the art sound technology for concerts and a playschool in the basement.

 

One of the unique internal features is the baptism pool. A brave achievement that creates a very relaxing atmosphere with in the church during services or pray, as you can hear the water cascading over the edge.

 

Vågen Videregående Skole, Sandnes, Stavanger, Norway

December 20, 2010

The Vågen Skole has just been completed as the first excited students begin to arrive. Justifiably very proud of the latest creation by Link Arkitektur AS. The college is situated in the fjords of Sandnes, surrounded by the industrial elements of the town, every inch of space was utilised to mazimise the capacity. The buildings plan ends only centermeters from the council boundaries.

 

A large structure for such a small town is cleverly intergrated by the delicate choice of materials. The sand coloured cladding reflects the nordic light beautifully, creating a positive energy in an otherwise drab part of town. It feels like Sandnes is on the right track to architectural revival.

 

Nordahl Grieg Videregående Skole, Bergen, Norway

December 20, 2010

This is the latest college addition to Bergen community on the West coast of Norway. The college is designed by Link Arkitektur AS, they are among the leading architect offices in Scandinavia. The offices have a staff of approximately 240 professionals.

The building exhibits a range of fascinating design elements that combine to deliver a stimulating environment for the teenagers to develop in. The exterior is a combination of pre treated lead and glass facades. As you progress into the central atrium you are immediately made aware of the scale of the building. Split over three floors the clever intergration of passage ways and classroom layouts leads to a very open feel.

The classroom walls are made of clear and tinted glass, which looks fantastic, how the teachers control the visual exchange between students in different classrooms, I’m unsure. I know this would certainly be a challenge in London, but perhaps the Norwegian students are a little better behaved!


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