Archive for the ‘Graphic Structue’ Category

Capita Symonds, Gatwick North Terminal Extension

February 22, 2012

As the Olympics draw closer, Britain moves one step nearer to delivering participants and spectators there on time. Capita Symonds have recently completed the complex extension of Gatwick’s North Terminal, the busiest single runway airport in the world. The upgrade involves a new state of the art passenger and transport interchange, Departures and Arrivals concourse extension and new multi storey car park. The extension costing £150+m, will increase the passenger capacity by 10 million.

Hundven-Clements Photography have been onsite to document this monumental structure in the depths of winter. The weather was not our side during the day so the interior was where we begun, later on in the day we were blessed with 20 mins of colour as the sun set. With a multi layered approach to design by Capita, a swift transition between shuttle transport and the departure halls has been created. The dramatic roof generates a pleasant feeling of openness allowing natural light to illuminate the platforms during the daytime.

Photographing operational public structures on this scale comes with an array of logistical and photographic challenges. The first being access, understandably Gatwick has high security regulations in place, so an interview to obtain a permit to photograph was essential. Once onsite we found the general public to be surprisingly accommodating with appearing in photos, I guess the prospect of two weeks in Mauritus away from a British winter helped! Let us know what you think of the new development.

 

 

Marzorati Ronchetti Metal Sculptures

January 18, 2012

Marzorati Ronchetti is no ordinary metal manufacturer. They produce some of the most elegant refined structures with every type of metal imaginable for the worlds greatest designers. MR concentrate on the high end design market for architects like Norman Foster and notable artists like Anish Kapoor. With the engineering and design capabilities to manufacture unusual solutions tailored for specific environments a diverse range of products are the result.

With the up and coming birthday of the company MR commissioned Hundven-Clements Photography to document a range of their London successes, here are the results.

 

Blackwall Way Development, London

September 18, 2011

Photographed for Domus Facades the company responsible for the exterior cladding. An intimate photographic study exploring the interplay between light and the cladded surfaces was produced.

En Til En Arkitekter AS, Biskopshavn, Bergen

June 28, 2011

As a small company focussing on a one to one relationship with all their clients, En Til En specialises in delivering dramatic and sensetive solutions. Utilising traditional Nordic craftmanship in combination with modern technology and techniques results in some fascinating designs.

The new residential development at Biskopshavn on the coast heading north out of Bergen, is a great example of their bold design, contrasting with the stunning surrounding landscape. I feel their utilisation of a curved element on the exterior facade adds a femine aesthetic, producing a more approachable structure.




London Metropolitan University Renovations

April 21, 2011

Cartwright Pickard Architects have taken a complex structure in the form of London’s famous Metropolitan University and converted it in to a pure colour experience. The buildings from the 70’s were exhibiting such worn and depressing institutional designs that students have even left because of it. During my documentation of the recently opened renovation one of the lecturers explained that international students specifically from the US were so shocked by the pre-renervation conditions (akin to a mental institute) that they have been known to leave.

Now Peter Cartwright and James Pickard have delivered a stimulating renovation that plays upon the existing architectural features whilst maintaining a very tight expenditure programme.The dramatic use of primary colours and cost effective, textured surfaces has delivered a new energy avoiding the costly expenses of rebuilding.

As government budgets bite hard in the education sector, I think we will be seeing a lot more renovations in the future, let’s hope they’re all as inspiring as this one.

Structural Divinity Slideshow

January 2, 2011

The symbolic design of contrasting religious architectural buildings across Southern Africa provides a fascinating insight into the colonial ideologies of Europe and the subsequent environments that remain.

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Contemporary Church Design

December 20, 2010

Frøyland og Orstad Kirke, Norway

Having just returned from 3 months in Southern Africa photographing over 200+ religious structures it only seemed natural to head to the icy temperatures of Norway. Link Arkitektur AS have delivered a fascinating amalgamation of traditional Scandinavian design with an almost contemporary Italian energy inside.

The church nestles in the countryside of Kleppe Kommune, surrounded by the rolling hills that are prevalent in this district just outside of Stavanger. The church also functions as a local theatre with state of the art sound technology for concerts and a playschool in the basement.

 

One of the unique internal features is the baptism pool. A brave achievement that creates a very relaxing atmosphere with in the church during services or pray, as you can hear the water cascading over the edge.

 

Moses Mabhida Stadium

June 23, 2010

This elegantly proportioned stadium bathed in the glorious african winter sunlight of Durban. Whilst shooting the new Moses Mabhida Station on commission for Ove Arup & Partners Ltd I couldn’t resist adding an extra day to the trip to obtain a few images of Durban’s new stadium.

I had a lot of fun driving around durban hunting for high buildings to obtain a different view of the stadium in situ.

The first official football match was played back in November 2009, it has now been fully embraced by the 2010 World Cup supporters and players.

The architects and designers on this project were Theunissen Jankowitz Durban, Ambro-Afrique Consultants, Osmond Lange Architects & Planners, NSM Designs and Mthulisi Msimang who together formed the Joint Venture Architectural Team called ‘Ibhola Lethu Consortium’.

Santuario Della Madonna Delle Lacrime, Syracusa, Sicilia.

September 28, 2009

Syracuse’s most recent architectural landmark, Sanctuary of Our Lady of the Tears was designed based on the shape of a tear. Officially opened in 1994 it reaches the grand height of 102m. I can’t say I was enamoured with the external structure but the internal experience is extremely profound.

On 29 August 1953, a small plaster image of the Virgin Mary in the house of Angelo Iannuso and Antonina Giusto suddenly began to shed tears. The following days, on 30 and 31 August and on 1 September, tears were seen again on the Virgin’s face. The cavernous space was designed to house the image which reportedly bestowed 300+ miraculous cures over a few months after the tears. Sitting in the space listening to the nuns pray in harmony as the sounds echo up in to the heavens you can forgive the architects Michel Andrault and Pierre Parat for it’s external facade.

As construction begun on the church, an extensive network of houses and streets from the Roman and Greek periods were discovered. Elements of these and another sanctuary to the goddess Demeter and Kore (5th-4th century BC) remain in the crypt.

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Kengo Kuma’s Oribe Tea Pavilion, Syracuse, Sicily.

September 28, 2009

I stumbled upon this sensitive piece of Japanese design whilst sheltering from the rain in Syracuse, Sicily. Nested in a courtyard at the centre of Ortygia it contrasts dramatically with the baroque surroundings. Originally created by Kengo Kuma in the Mino ceramics Park in Tajimi, Japan in honour of the ceramics artist and master of the tea ceremony, Furuta Oribe (1544-1615).

“The Oribe tea pavilion is one of the most poetic and significant works of Kengo Kuma and demonstrates his special approach to architecture. The pavilion emphasizes the aesthetic yet functional properties of polycarbonate in a special way and shows that multi wall sheets can be used in a radically new manner. Here they have been used by Kengo Kuma to create a space for contemplation in harmony with Zen aesthetics. The intention of this famous architect was to establish a relationship between material and light, creating a feeling of intimacy and seclusion in contrast to the transparency of the shell”.

The Oribe tea pavilion is one of the most poetic and significant works of Kengo Kuma and demonstrates his special approach to architecture.
The pavilion emphasizes the aesthetic yet functional properties of polycarbonate in a special way and shows that multi wall sheets can be used in a radically new manner. Here they have been used by Kengo Kuma to create a space for contemplation in harmony with Zen aesthetics. The intention of this famous architect was to establish a relationship between material and light, creating a feeling of intimacy and seclusion in contrast to the transparency of the shell

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