Kengo Kuma’s Oribe Tea Pavilion, Syracuse, Sicily.

I stumbled upon this sensitive piece of Japanese design whilst sheltering from the rain in Syracuse, Sicily. Nested in a courtyard at the centre of Ortygia it contrasts dramatically with the baroque surroundings. Originally created by Kengo Kuma in the Mino ceramics Park in Tajimi, Japan in honour of the ceramics artist and master of the tea ceremony, Furuta Oribe (1544-1615).

“The Oribe tea pavilion is one of the most poetic and significant works of Kengo Kuma and demonstrates his special approach to architecture. The pavilion emphasizes the aesthetic yet functional properties of polycarbonate in a special way and shows that multi wall sheets can be used in a radically new manner. Here they have been used by Kengo Kuma to create a space for contemplation in harmony with Zen aesthetics. The intention of this famous architect was to establish a relationship between material and light, creating a feeling of intimacy and seclusion in contrast to the transparency of the shell”.

The Oribe tea pavilion is one of the most poetic and significant works of Kengo Kuma and demonstrates his special approach to architecture.
The pavilion emphasizes the aesthetic yet functional properties of polycarbonate in a special way and shows that multi wall sheets can be used in a radically new manner. Here they have been used by Kengo Kuma to create a space for contemplation in harmony with Zen aesthetics. The intention of this famous architect was to establish a relationship between material and light, creating a feeling of intimacy and seclusion in contrast to the transparency of the shell

kengo_kuma_oribe_daniel_clements_photography02
kengo_kuma_oribe_daniel_clements_photography03
kengo_kuma_oribe_daniel_clements_photography04
kengo_kuma_oribe_daniel_clements_photography05
kengo_kuma_oribe_daniel_clements_photography06

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

One Response to “Kengo Kuma’s Oribe Tea Pavilion, Syracuse, Sicily.”

  1. Judit Bellostes : de plástico, de aire y de luz - oribe tea house , Estudio de arquitectura Says:

    […] publicado en “Issuu”) + Oribe tea house – rolu (artículo de texto con fotografías) + Oribe tea house – Daniel Clements (artículo de texto con fotografías) + Oribe tea house – Bayer (artículo de texto con […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: